Scientific American January 1933 Volume 148 Number 1

By: Munn, Orson D.

Price: $199.95

Quantity: 1 available


Features: Mount Rushmore - Mountain sculpture - it was necessary to develop a new method of removing stone in cutting Stone Mountain and Mount Rushmore Memorials; Fast rail car on pneumatic tires - first pneumatic-tired, diesel-electric car of light weight and high speed goes into service in this country; Editorials - rehabilitiation necessary - planetary vibrations - progress; Delicate instruments tame wild airplanes - airplane characteristics are determined by instruments which measure stresses on models in wind tunnel gales; The new wave atom, elusive and mysterious - "a pleasing peep into a thing which, admittedly, only the mathematician can hope to bring into clear focus; Concrete that withstands the sea - new method of impregnating concrete with asphalt makes the concrete resistant to corrosion of sea water and chemicals; The amazing process of vision - an intensely interesting discussion of the infinite superiority of the eye over any lens that man can make; The disappearance of the red man's culture - the war paint and regalia of the Indian now belong only to the circus; Fiddling on aluminum - musicians said it couldn't be made, but the aluminum violin is an accomplished fact; The snow surveyor of the sierras - expected run-off during summer to city water reservoirs is surveyed in winter in the mountains; Invention - a coming profession - invention has come of age and is ready to be included in the curricula of schools; The Kukulograph (later marketed as "Spirograph") - the "Circle-circle-writer" with which intricate designs in loops and whorls may be made; Leather power-belts regain favor - improvements in leather belt making portend a reversion to group drive instead of the present individual drive; Science aids canners - new process of removing oxygen from foods before sealing in cans prevents oxidation that causes spoilage; Natural gas greets a substitute - newly developed gas manufactured from diesel oil may be used to replace natural gas in an emergency; Toothpaste facts and fancies - merits lie principally in imagination of ad writers, say chemists. Unmarked. Average wear.

Title: Scientific American January 1933 Volume 148 Number 1

Author: Munn, Orson D.

Categories: Magazine Back Issues,

Edition: First Edition

Publisher: New York, Scientific American Publishing Company: 1933

Binding: Paperback

Condition: Good

Size: 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall

Seller ID: 35507792

Keywords: Features: Mount Rushmore - Mountain sculpture - it was necessary to develop a new method of removing stone in cutting Stone Mountain and Mount Rushmore Memorials; Fast rail car on pneumatic tires - first pneumatic-tored, diesel-electric car of light weight and high speed goes into service in this country; Editorials - rehabilitiation necessary - planetary vibrations - progress; Delicate instruments tame wild airplanes - airplane characteristics are determined by instruments which measure stresses on models in wind tunnel gales; The new wave atom, elusive and mysterious - "a pleasing peep into a thing which, admittedly, only the mathematician can hope to bring into clear focus; Concrete that withstands the sea - new method of impregnating concrete with asphalt makes the concrete resistant to corrosion of sea water and chemicals; The amazing process of vision - an intensely interesting discussion of the infinite superiority of the eye over any lens that man can make; The disappearance of the red man's culture - the war paint and regalia of the Indian now belong only to the circus; Fiddling on aluminum - musicians said it couldn't be made, but the aluminum violin is an accomplished fact; The snow surveyor of the sierras - expected run-off during summer to city water reservoirs is surveyed in winter in the mountains; Invention - a coming profession - invention has come of age and is ready to be included in the curricula of schools; The Kukulograph (later marketed as "Spirograph") - the "Circle-circle-writer" with which intricate designs in loops and whorls may be made; Leather power-belts regain favor - improvements in leather belt making portend a reversion to group drive instead of the present individual drive; Science aids canners - new process of removing oxygen from foods before sealing in cans prevents oxidation that causes spoilage; Natural gas greets a substitute - newly developed gas manufactured from diesel oil may be used to replace natural gas in an emergency; Toothpaste facts and fancies - merits lie principally in imagination of ad writers, say chemists. Unmarked. Average wear.,