Scientific American October 1932 Volume 147 Number 4

By: Munn, Orson D.

Price: $199.95

Quantity: 1 available


Features: New knowledge on the rise of man - the Oriental Institute is a great research laboratory for the investigation of the early career of civilized man; Editorials - air transport - "seed" - a weapon for peace; Ultr-violet light and forgery - by making use of fluorescence, professional investigators detect forgeries in documents; Avalances and avalanche protection - in the Alps, great structures are necessary to divert avalanches; Things that happen in sunspots - An astronomer's photograph of the spectrum of a sunspot may give him material for many months of study and analysis; America emerges from partial maritime eclipse - completion of the first of two great liners for the north Atlantic route gives a promise of a revived great merchant marine; Flying in the beginning - from man-carrying kites, the army experimenters turned to gliders; In a rifle factory - over 2500 operations are required to produce accurate rifles that stand the test of use; Factory punishment for tires; Physical laboratories of the stars - the atoms in the stars have been braodcasting a description of their surroundings for millions of years; Profiting by enforced leisure - children, unemployed persons, hospital patients, and even jail inmates are increasing their demand for helpful books; Hoover Dam - conclusion - materials, supplies, manpower, and future program; The liner that cannot roll - new italian line ship has world's largest gyro-stabilizer plant; A post office for freight - New Union freight terminal in New York is first step in solution of freight handling and distribution problem; Houses of the future - they may be made in factories to individual design; Salmon fishing - great industry brings millions of dollars yearly to the pacific coast - how the salmon are caught and canned. Prior owner's pencilled name mostly erased from top of front cover.

Title: Scientific American October 1932 Volume 147 Number 4

Author: Munn, Orson D.

Categories: Magazine Back Issues,

Edition: First Edition

Publisher: New York, Scientific American Publishing Company: 1932

Binding: Paperback

Condition: Good

Size: 4to - over 9¾" - 12" tall

Seller ID: 35507804

Keywords: Features: New knowledge on the rise of man - the Oriental Institute is a great research laboratory for the investigation of the early career of civilized man; Editorials - air transport - "seed" - a weapon for peace; Ultr-violet light and forgery - by making use of fluorescence, professional investigators detect forgeries in documents; Avalances and avalanche protection - in the Alps, great structures are necessary to divert avalanches; Things that happen in sunspots - An astronomer's photograph of the spectrum of a sunspot may give him material for many months of study and analysis; America emerges from partial maritime eclipse - completion of the first of two great liners for the north Atlantic route gives a promise of a revived great merchant marine; Flying in the beginning - from man-carrying kites, the army experimenters turned to gliders; In a rifle factory - over 2500 operations are required to produce accurate rifles that stand the test of use; Factory punishment for tires; Physical laboratories of the stars - the atoms in the stars have been braodcasting a description of their surroundings for millions of years; Profiting by enforced leisure - children, unemployed persons, hospital patients, and even jail inmates are increasing their demand for helpful books; Hoover Dam - conclusion - materials, supplies, manpower, and future program; The liner that cannot roll - new italian line ship has world's largest gyro-stabilizer plant; A post office for freight - New Union freight terminal in New York is first step in solution of freight handling and distribution problem; Houses of the future - they may be made in factories to individual design; Salmon fishing - great industry brings millions of dollars yearly to the pacific coast - how the salmon are caught and canned. Prior owner's pencilled name mostly erased from top of front cover.,